Wednesday, June 22, 2016

New(ish)! Lavender Tea Tree Charcoal Handmade Soap

Newish because I added it to my shop last summer. I haven't shared all the yummy goodness of it here, though.

I've wanted to make a soap with activated charcoal for a while. Traditionally, activated charcoal is used to draw out impurities. I'm not sure if that quality carries over to the soap due to the fact that the lather is rinsed away fairly quickly. It definitely adds a kind of soft, creamy feel to the lather and a gorgeous, deep marbled grey color to the soap. This is most impressive after one or two uses when the water has polished the soap. So pretty!
https://www.etsy.com/listing/243788831/lavender-tea-tree-charcoal-artisan-soap?ref=shop_home_feat_1

While it can be used as a hand or body soap, the activated charcoal made me take it in a facial soap direction. I love my Tea Tree Oil facial soap, but wanted to change it up a bit, so I added lavender essential oil as the main note with the tea tree oil as a mellower, supporting note. I think the reduction of tto in this soap makes it a bit milder than my Tea Tree Oil soap as well. Both essential oils are thought to have beneficial properties for your skin, and they smell lovely together.

My Lavender Tea Tree Charcoal Soap is in stock in my Etsy shop. My Tea Tree Oil Soap is currently sold out. Look for more soon. :-)

Friday, June 10, 2016

Reusable produce bags and cloth napkins

I'm getting better at remembering my reusable bags when we go shopping, especially now that I have an Aldi nearby. It's made me start rethinking the plastic produce bags. I haven't found as many alternatives to them on the market, so I decided to make my own.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/280522062/net-reusable-produce-bag?ref=shop_home_active_3

I used a lightweight netting material so you can see what's inside.It's so light and see-through in fact that it doesn't want to show up well in photos. Hmm.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/280522062/net-reusable-produce-bag?ref=shop_home_active_3

Marginally better? I don't know. Anyway, you can find my nifty reusable produce bags here in my Etsy shop.

On a similar note, I also added a set of cloth napkins in a cute sunflower print.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/294031713/sunflower-cotton-cloth-18-inch-napkins?ref=related-6

https://www.etsy.com/listing/294031713/sunflower-cotton-cloth-18-inch-napkins?ref=related-6

Find them here in my Etsy shop. I plan to make and add more prints soon.

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Quick Drawstring Bag Tutorial or How to Reuse Your SubEarthan Cottage Soap Wrapping

I wrap my soaps in fabric because it looks nice, it allows the soap to breathe (read here for why), and because it feels better than plastic. I often wonder what happens to the wrapping. I'm sure there are some that toss it. I know of one person who collects the fabric for quilts. For those of you who, like me, don't want to throw away something that could be useful but don't know what to do with it, I have a tutorial for a drawstring pouch, just for you.

This is done with the wrapping from one of my soaps, but you could make it in any size you like.

Materials
Cloth wrapper from soap (roughly 8x11 inches)
Jute string from soap (about 29 inches)
Thread


Tools
Needle or Sewing machine
Safety pin or Bodkin
Scissors
Iron

First, iron your fabric flat. Then, fold down a long edge about 3/4 of an inch to one inch and press. This is for the casing. It doesn't have to be super precise.
Sew a straight seam along the bottom of the flap to form the casing. All the sewing can be done by hand or machine. I have no time or patience, so I choose machine. Fold your material in half with right sides together like a book.

The fold is at the bottom of this photo.
Next, starting just below the casing seam, sew down the side and across the bottom. I use anywhere from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch seam allowance for this. Again, it doesn't have to be precise.

 With scissors, clip the bottom corners, being careful not to cut your stitching. You could probably skip this step, but it helps the corners look square and crisp. Turn your bag right side out.

Now it's time to thread the string. Tie one end of the string to a safety pin, large paper clip, or attach a small bodkin. This makes it easier to work it through the casing. Thread it through the casing, safety pin first. 

Once you get the string to the other side, remove your safety pin or other tool and adjust the string so that the ends are even.

 Knot the ends together once or twice to keep it from coming out.

Ta-da! It's done! Perfect for organizing your purse, storing jewelry or other small items, or as a small gift bag.

Or holding your favorite bar of soap.

Tutorials are always a little complicated to write because it's easy to overlook small steps in things you do frequently. If something is unclear, please ask. :-)

If you have any other creative uses for a SubEarthan Cottage soap wrapper, I would love to hear it!


Thursday, May 12, 2016

Proper Care and Feeding of Your Bar Soap

One of my peeves is soggy, mushy bar soap. One, it's gross. Two, it makes a mess. Three, it's a waste of soap to let it melt away in a dish rather than being used. There are a few ways to prevent the mush and have a long-lasting bar of soap.

The biggest enemy of soap is moisture, so the key to a long lasting bar of soap is to keep it as dry as possible. All soap requires some liquid as an ingredient. The trick is to keep it to a minimum and allow it to cure properly. The longer a soap cures, the more moisture will evaporate and result in a harder bar. This is one reason I wrap my soaps in cloth: the cloth allows the soap to continue to harden even after it's wrapped.

One thing you can do at home is to allow your soap to harden is to store it away from the humid bathroom and, if it is packaged in plastic or other non-breathable material, unwrap it. You can take advantage of fragrant soaps by storing them in someplace like a linen closet or dresser drawer. That way, you'll scent your linens or clothes while hardening your soap.

Once you're ready to use your soap, consider where you put it. The absolute worst place is in the shower where the water will hit it continuously. Observe where the water flows and use a soap dish out of the water's path. If you don't mind an extra step, take it out of the shower when not in use. Personally, I don't do this or I would probably forget to grab it on my way in and have to step out dripping to get it.

Finally, the most important thing you can do to make your soap last is to let it dry out between uses. To accomplish this, you need a soap dish or surface that allows proper drainage. The best option is something that raises the soap up and allows water to drip away and air to circulate under the bar of soap. Something like this is good for a handmade option. If you already have a soap dish you like that doesn't drain well, I've found spiky plastic soap savers similar to this in packs of two at the dollar store. You can use them with a soap dish or alone on the counter. Depending on the shape of your soap, you can also rest the soap up on it's side rather than flat. This doesn't allow the soap to dry as well on that edge, but it does limit the surface area that stays damp. I've used all of the above methods to allow my soap to dry and have had success with each. I'm sure there are others I haven't tried.

Nobody likes to see money washed down the drain. Whether you buy your soap at a supermarket or handmade from a soap maker like me, I hope these tips help you to get the most out of your soap.


Friday, April 29, 2016

Blog-keeping

 Just a few notes today:

1. I'm working on my website, http://subearthancottage.com. You can find my about page, blog and shop all in one place. Currently the shop is still through Etsy, so you need an Etsy account to shop there. If you have problems or concerns with that, please contact me so I can help you out.

2. Please, subscribe to my newsletter. I hate clogged inboxes as much as everyone else, so I send emails very sparingly. When I do, there's usually a sale or coupon for my shop involved. Sign ups are to the right on Blogger and bottom on my website.

3. Usually when people talk about no-poo, they're referring to the baking soda and acv variety. I finally found someone who goes the natural bar soap route like I do. Here's her method:
http://dontwastethecrumbs.com/2016/04/how-to-wash-your-hair-without-shampoo/. She has more awesome information for frugal, healthy living, so I encourage you to browse around.

4. In case you haven't seen my take on soap as shampoo, here it is: http://mycrazycottage.blogspot.com/2012/11/shampoo-bar-101-revisited.html#more. I totally forgot about taking a break from it after B was born. Apparently that's normal for me, because I've done it again since Thadd was born and now I'm paying the price. At least I know the transition period doesn't last forever and I'll be able to ditch the pony tail soon. Not that I'm going to want to. Summers are HOT!